• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Should We Change?

The 2000 Presidential election, particularly the fuss about the ballots in Florida, caused a lot of people to ask again, isn't there a better way? Variations of the statement, “if we can put a man on the moon” or “if we can build a space station, why can't we do a better job of counting our votes?” were found in Letters to the Editor, were voiced on radio talk shows and in Web chat rooms and newsgroups, and were discussed in gathering places around the country.

With the improvements in technology, particularly the expansion of access to the Internet, it was inevitable that people would begin discussing the technology as a way of solving certain problems with elections. The problems most frequently mentioned were low voter turnout and access to elections for those who have trouble physically getting to the polls. In other words, issues of convenience and admission. Additionally, many people assume that counting by computer is more precise, provides quicker results, and is less prone to fraud. Computer tabulation would avoid hand tabulations, misreading optical scanners, or dimpled chad debates. Finally (as is frequently done in discussions of new uses for technologies), there is some promise of saving money using technology. If fair elections were possible without quite so many people and logistical challenges involved in transporting and setting up and counting ballots, it would be less expensive to run the elections and that would be a good thing.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint