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Part II: Organizing Information  > Organizing Your Files

Chapter 5. Organizing Your Files

To earn money while going to college, Phil Spencer started working part-time as an Administrative Assistant for Contoso, Ltd.—an 11-person company that resells security services for Webmasters. What Phil is finding is that the electronic filing system is a mess. Everyone has filed everything exactly the way they want to, without any coordination. Some people put their files on their local drives, some on the network. Some put all files in My Documents, some put them in various places throughout drive C. From looking at the filenames, Phil can only identify the purpose of less than 10 percent of the files. In fact, most of the time he can’t tell which documents are drafts and which are final copies. As people left the company, their files remained so the result is the filing “systems” of 20 people or more!

Phil is facing a morass of files, some of them valuable, many of them worthless, and people are unable to find the information they need. The CEO knows she has a lot of valuable IP (intellectual property) stored in Contoso’s files, but there is no way to capture that data, and new hires have to reinvent the wheel rather than building on past knowledge. Phil realizes that although creating a systematic filing system isn’t much fun, it will add more value to the company than virtually anything else he can do. He realizes he has a big job in front of him. Fortunately he also knows that with Microsoft Windows 2000 and Microsoft Office XP, he has the tools to do the job efficiently and well.


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