• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

The P2P Model

P2P has come to describe a way for people to use the Internet to exchange files with each other directly or through a mediating server. To put this simply, a group of users decide they want to make files on their computers available to other users who might want them; a central computer is set up to index these files; and all the users use the same software and formatting to make everything work. You decide you want a specific file. You go search on the central computer for an index for the file you want. Three are located. Sammy, Betty, and Joe each have a file you want. (You don't know any of these people, but they've got the same software you do, and the files have been designated as accessible.) You've accessed from Joe's computer before, and his files are good quality. So you go directly to Joe's computer and download the file. This is very similar to how the MP3 file-sharing software on Napster worked. (In the case of Napster, however, files went through a centralized server.)

Ironically, this is very similar to early online practices when one person with a modem would contact another person with a modem to exchange files. In those days, the contact might be made because of a listing on an old bulletin board system. Let's say that someone was looking for a specific computer program, and the listing said that Bob had it and gave information on how to contact Bob.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint