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Content

After computers became commonplace but before the Web, content was managed within small groups. Products such as Lotus Notes and document management applications (dubbed groupware) were designed for teams of fewer than 20 people. These were used to fill in forms and create standalone documents, such as technical publications or applications for drug approvals, for example. Content was usually structured and homogeneous. Changes were infrequent. Business processes and the preparation of their associated documentation had defined life cycle.

The Internet explosion of the mid-1990s changed the way businesses store and access their information. These digital assets need to be referenced and connected to each other. The power of the Web is its ability to link knowledge and information in a variety of forms: text, images, graphics, and statistics. The Web allowed the information to be accessed (it could be “looked up”). For example, an HTML Web page could reference a Word document. The Word document could call up a PDF file, and all three elements could be combined by a Java JSP for dynamic content rendition addresses of content resources that could be “linked to” over the Web. URLs, or hyperlinking, completely transformed the way the world shares collective knowledge stores.


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