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Lesson 5. Adding Audio >  Fading audio in and out

Fading audio in and out

In Premiere, you can fade audio in and out to create more subtle transitions between clips. First, let's fade out the end of the audio track linked to the Feet1.mov video clip.

1.
In the lower left corner of the Timeline window, choose 1/2 Second from the Time Unit pop-up menu.

2.
In the Timeline window, click the arrow to the left of the Audio 2 track to expand it.

Running through the center of the waveform is a red line called the fade control, sometimes known as a rubber band. The fade control specifies the relative volume of the audio. By default, the fade control is a straight line, meaning that the volume is constant across the clip. To add a fade, you move one end of the fade control up or down.

Note

The blue line running through the waveform is the pan control, which lets you adjust the degree to which sound plays in the left or right stereo channel. You will not change the pan control in this lesson.

3.
In the Feet1.mov audio track, click on the fade control at a point that corresponds to the middle of the Hall2.mov video clip.



Clicking creates a small red square, called a handle. A handle breaks the fade control into separate segments so that you can adjust portions of the audio. The fade control always includes a handle at either end, so you don't have to create those handles.

4.
At the end of the audio clip, drag the handle down as far as it will go.



This creates a downward slope from the first handle you created. A downward slope fades out the audio. In this case, because you dragged the handle down to the bottom, the audio fades out to no sound at all.

The audio in the Horror.aif clip starts too abruptly and we want to fade it up at the end to build suspense. To make these changes, you'll fade in the audio by creating two separate handles.

5.
Click the arrow next to the Audio 3 track to expand that track.

6.
In the Horror.aif audio clip, click the fade control about 1/2 second from the In point. Then drag the handle at the In point all the way down.



The upward slope fades in the audio. Now let's slowly raise the volume.

7.
Click on the Fade Control in Horror.aif at a point that corresponds to the handle you created in the Audio 2 track. Another handle is created.

8.
Drag the handle at the right end of the Fade Control all the way up to increase the volume at the end of the clip.

The volume in this audio clip will now fade in to full-level, maintain that level for about two seconds, and then slowly rise to an even higher level at the end of the clip.



Let's preview this.

9.
Make sure the work area bar covers the entire video program, and then press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

In about the middle of the piece, you may have noticed that the man calls out a name, but the volume is too low for it to be heard clearly. You'll need to boost just that portion of the audio clip.

10.
Drag the edit line through the middle of the video program to locate "Marilyn" in the audio portion of the Feet1.mov clip.

11.
Click on the Fade Control on either side of the pulse that forms the word "Marilyn" (at 11:12 and 12:03).



12.
Just to the right of the first handle click and drag upward to create and move a handle in one step.



13.
Position the pointer just to the left of the handle you created at the end of the pulse. Then click and drag upward to create and move a handle in one step.



Check the level by playing this part of the project.

14.
Make sure the work area bar covers the area of the clip you just changed, and then press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

Finally, the sound effect we added before the man turns is a little too loud. You'll use a new technique to change the volume throughout the clip.

15.
Click the arrow next to the Audio 1 track to expand it.

16.
Locate Danger.aif in the Audio 1 track. Position the pointer on the fade control anywhere between the two handles. Hold down the Shift key and drag the segment downward until the level indication reads about –5 db. Notice that Premiere lets you drag outside the audio track so that you can make fine adjustments in the level.



The entire segment moves, adjusting its volume.

17.
To preview the project, make sure the work area bar covers all your clips. Then press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).

18.
Save the project.


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