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Transitions and Effects > Transitions and Effects - Pg. 178

Installing More Effects your movies, frame by frame, to eliminate unwanted background elements, for example. The nice part about the cf/x effects is that you can apply them to only a part of the screen; you just drag across the area you want the effect to affect. The other nice part is that you can buy only the plug-in you want (at prices like free, $1.50, or $10) without having to buy a whole package. Tip: If you have more time than money, you can create a number of fantastic special effects in QuickTime Player Pro, including picture-in-picture effects, "video wall" simulations, and so on. See the end of Chapter 14 for an introduction to this concept of multiple video tracks in a single clip. Note, too, that QuickTime itself offers a wealth of special effects, including blur, color balance, emboss and edge detection, and many more. They all await in the Filter box that appears when you export a movie from iMovie, as described in Chapter 12. If you're aching to use one of those flters in your iMovie project, export the clip as a full-quality DV QuickTime movie, process it with those Filters, and then reimport it into your iMovie project.