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outer edges of the picture, the visual story is preserved, and your hero can safely call home. Note: Readers and their lawyers will please forgive the science of this example, in that (a) there is no such thing as teleportation, (b) there is no air to breathe on the moons of Jupiter, let alone to talk with, (c) the hero and his colleague would die almost instantly from catastrophic depressurization, and (d) even assuming the hero could make the call out, the speed of light ensures that it would take hours for his message to reach earth. When writing computer books, authors are limited by the royalty-free art collections they have on hand. The art used here appears courtesy of Ulead's Royalty Free Media collection ( Phase 1: Prepare Your Video You can keep your action within the action-safe area in either of two ways: ·Framecorrectlytobeginwith.Keeping important visual features and motion away from the edges of your video as you record it is by far the easiest solution. ·Resizethefootage.You can also buy iMovie plug-ins (see the end of Chapter 6) that resize your video and center it within the frame. This approach, however, takes a lot of time and effort, and may degrade the video quality. Phase 2: Insert Chapter Markers If you've ever rented or bought a movie on DVD, you're already familiar with chapters, better known as scenes (Figure 15-4). Figure 15-4: Most DVDs offer something called a scene menu like this one (from the movie Ronin), which lets viewers jump directly to their favorite scenes in the movie. Your DVD scene menus probably won't be quite this elabo- rate, but you get the idea. chapter15:fromimovietoidvd 357