Share this Page URL
Help

Playing the Movie in its Own Window > Playing the Movie in its Own Window - Pg. 323

dress) for your new movie is www.imovienut.com/mymovie.mov. (If you placed it into a folder within your Web site listing--called ficks, for example--then the address is www.imovienut.com/ficks/mymovie.mov.) Tip: Mac and Windows computers consider capital and lowercase letters equivalent in Web addresses like these. The Unix machines that dish out Web pages by the millions, however, don't. Therefore, using only low- ercase letters is a good precaution to avoid subjecting your visitors to "Web page not found" messages. Posting a Movie on Your Own Web Site If one of your fans types this address into the Web browser or clicks a link that goes to this address, one of three things happens: · If your visitor's computer has the QuickTime plug-in software installed (almost all modern Macs do), a new little movie window opens automatically. (See Figure 13-5.) A few seconds later, it begins to play automatically. · If your visitor doesn't have this QuickTime plug-in installed, which is possible if she's using a Windows computer, a message appears onscreen. It offers three choices: Track down the necessary plug-in, download the QuickTime movie to the hard drive, or choose another program to play the movie. Tip: To make it easier for your Windows friends to download the plug-in necessary to watch QuickTime movies, create a link on your Web page that says something like: "To watch this movie, please download the free QuickTime plug-in at http://www.apple.com/quicktime." · Some browsers have been confgured to hand off all downloadable fles whose names end with .mov to a helper application, such as QuickTime Player. In such cases, QuickTime Player now opens (independently from the browser), and the movie appears in its window. UP TO SPEED Getting a Web Site If you want a Web site, you've got to get somebody to host it, somebody with a full-time, high-speed Internet connec- tion who's willing to lend a few megs of hard drive space to hold your text, pictures, and movies. Fortunately, most Internet service providers--including America Online and EarthLink--offer a small amount of Web space at no charge. Check your ISP's Web page (or, on America Online, keyword: MyPlace) for rudimentary instructions on creating a Web page and posting it online. (For more detailed instructions, consider reading a book on the topic.) If your ISP doesn't offer Web hosting, or if you need more room for your movies, you'll fnd hundreds or thousands of Web hosting companies only too eager to sign you up as a client. A search at www.google.com should unearth as many hosting services as you'd ever need. And one more thing. If you want to share a movie with only a small circle of admirers, and you have a high-speed con- nection like cable modem or DSL, you can turn your own Mac into a Web site, thanks to the Web Sharing feature built into Mac OS X. It's very convenient, because you don't have to upload your movies to anything. See Mac OS X: The Missing Manual for step-by-step instructions. chapter13:moviesontheweb--andonthephone 323