Share this Page URL

Turning Home Video into Pro Video > Turning Home Video into Pro Video - Pg. 58

Video Composition: A Crash Course in medium shots are usually visible only from the waist up. Medium shots are by far the most common ones on TV. · When you're zoomed in a lot, so that your subject flls the screen, you're using a close shot, tight shot, or closeup. These shots reveal detail, such as a character's reactions, which have a huge impact on how the audience reacts. Close shots are the best kind of shot if you plan to show your movie on a small screen, such as in a QuickTime movie or on a small TV. Note: You'll hear professionals talk about lots of other kinds of shots, too: the extreme closeup, the extreme long shot, the medium closeup, and so on--but they're all variations on the Big Three. Choosing your shots After you're fnished editing your video in iMovie, will it be viewed primarily on a computer screen or a TV screen? This important question may affect your choice of zoom level for each shot. If you plan to make QuickTime movies (for playback on computer screens), use a lot of closeups. Remember that most QuickTime movies play in a small window on the computer screen. Beware the wide shot that looks great on the TV or in the viewfnder, but when shrunk to QuickTime-movie size, reduces faces to white specks