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5. Audio > Cover Missing Audio with Room Tone

Cover Missing Audio with Room Tone

Sometimes, such as when a crewmember sneezes, you need to eliminate audio completely, but missing audio is immediately noticeable, even to those who have an untrained ear. Capturing “room tone” helps remedy this problem.

When you’re editing, sooner or later you will discover an edit that must eliminate audio in your timeline. Trying to avoid a certain word that someone said, using footage that was recorded after a scene ended, or hearing a car horn honking in the background are just a few examples of how this can occur. When you remove audio from a scene in these circumstances, you wind up removing audio from the scene completely.

A complete absence of audio is both noticeable and disturbing to your audience. In order to fix the problem, you need to fill the hole with nondescript audio. This nondescript audio is often called room tone, because it is simply audio that has been recorded in a silent room. Even though the room might be “silent,” there is audio to be captured, no matter how quiet it seems to be.


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