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Chapter 4. Managing Clips > Organizing Clips in Bins

Organizing Clips in Bins

Premiere Pro allows you to manage clips in the project in much the same way that you manage files on your computer operating system. The Project window's clip area can list individual items, or you create folder-like containers known as bins. You can specify whether to list imported clips in the topmost level of the Project window's organizational hierarchy or nested inside a bin. Naturally, you can move clips in and out of bins at any time. But although moving clips and bins is analogous to moving files and folders, there are important differences.

To create a bin

1.
In the Project window, click the Bin button (Figure 4.39).

Figure 4.39. In the Project window, click the Bin button.


A bin appears in the Project window. By default, new bins are named Bin01, Bin02, and so on. However, the name is highlighted, ready for you to change it.

2.
Enter a name for the bin (Figure 4.40).

Figure 4.40. Enter a name for the bin.


To view the contents of a bin

  • Do one of the following:

    • In list view, click the triangle next to the bin icon to expand the bin and view its contents in outline form (Figure 4.41).

      Figure 4.41. In list view, clicking the triangle next to the bin icon expands the bin and lets you view its contents in outline form.

    • In list view or icon view, double-click the bin to open it and view its contents in the main clip area of the Project window (Figure 4.42).

      Figure 4.42. In list or icon view, double-click the bin to open it and view its contents in the main clip area of the Project window.

Clips and Bins (Not Files and Folders)

Premiere Pro often employs film-editing metaphors. Film editors use bins to store and organize their clips (“clipped” from reels of film). The film dangles from hangers into a bin until the editor pulls down a strip of film and adds it to the sequence. Premiere Pro's bins may be less tactile than film bins, but they're also a lot less messy.

If you've never seen a film bin, you may find it more useful to compare clips stored in bins with files stored in folders on a drive. In fact, bins were called folders in older versions of Premiere. If you import a folder of files, the folder appears in the project as a bin containing clips.

Unlike some other editing programs, Premiere Pro saves bins as part of the project file, not as separate files.


To hide the contents of a bin

  • Do one of the following:

    • In list view, click the triangle next to the bin icon so that the bin's contents are hidden.

    • In list view or icon view, click the exit Bin button above the main clip area (Figure 4.43). The button looks and works like the Up One Level button in Windows XP.

      Figure 4.43. In list view or icon view, click the bin navigation icon.

To move clips into a bin

1.
In list view or icon view, make sure the clips you want to move and the destination bin are both visible in the main clip area of the Project window.

2.
Select one or more items.

3.
Drag the selected items to another bin (Figure 4.44).

Figure 4.44. Dragging selected items into a bin…


The items are moved into the destination bin (Figure 4.45).

Figure 4.45. …moves them into that bin.


To move items out of a bin in list view

1.
Set the Project window to list view.

2.
Click the triangle next to a bin to expand the bin and view its contents.

3.
Select the items you want to remove from the bin.

4.
Drag the selected items down to an empty part of the main clip area (Figure 4.46).

Figure 4.46. When you drag items to an empty part of the main clip area…


When you release the mouse, the selected items are moved out of the folder and placed one level up in the bin hierarchy (Figure 4.47).

Figure 4.47. …the selected items are moved out of the folder and placed one level up in the bin hierarchy.


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