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Chapter 3. Capturing & Importing Footage > Capturing DV vs. Digitizing Analog

Capturing DV vs. Digitizing Analog

If you're using the widely accepted DV format, the capture process couldn't be much easier. DV cameras compress the video in the camera and record the resulting DV signal onto any of several DV tape formats, most commonly, miniDV. If your computer is equipped with the right port—known variously as FireWire, iLink, or IEEE 1394—you can easily transfer footage from a DV camera or deck to your hard disk in much the same way you copy files from one disk to another. A single cable delivers the video, audio, and timecode information (Figure 3.1). Assuming that your system is fast enough to play DV (with its relatively lenient 3.6-MBps data rate), you're in business. The DV standard is just that: standard. It narrows down what would otherwise be an intimidating selection of video and audio settings into a single set of options.


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