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Lesson 4. Color and Opacity > The value of keyframe techniques

The value of keyframe techniques

To change an effect over time, you'll use a standard technique known as keyframing. This form of adjustment helps to enliven and animate your program.

When you create a keyframe, you specify the value of an effect property for a specific point in time. When you apply different values to keyframes, Adobe Premiere Pro automatically calculates the values between the keyframes, a process called interpolation.

For example, suppose that you wanted to use the Gaussian Blur effect and have it increase and then decrease over time. In this case, you would need to set three keyframes: the first with no blur; the second with more significant blur; and the third with no blur. Because Adobe Premiere Pro automatically interpolates the blur values between each keyframe, the blur gradually increases between the first and second keyframes and then gradually decreases between the second and third keyframes. Some Adobe Premiere Pro effects cannot be animated with keyframes.

You can set keyframes for most standard effects within the clip's duration. You can also animate clips by setting keyframes for fixed effect properties, such as position and scale. You can move, copy, or delete keyframes and change the interpolation method of a keyframe.

Keyframing in the Effect Controls window

Many of your keyframe adjustments will take place in the Effect Controls window. Keyframe values for spatial properties, such as the Position property for the Motion effect, can be adjusted in the Program view of the Monitor window by directly manipulating the clip. You can also adjust keyframe values in the Timeline window. Each keyframe icon indicates the keyframe's position in time. In the Effect Controls window, the shape of the keyframe also indicates how values between keyframes are interpolated.

In this lesson and throughout the remainder of this Classroom in a Book, you'll use keyframing to create changes, effects, and animations over the run-length or over a portion of the clips in your projects.

For more information, see Lesson 5, “Motion Paths,” and Lesson 6, “Special Effects: Using Effect Controls” in this Classroom in a Book.

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