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Chapter 10. Color Correction > About Color Correcting

About Color Correcting

Color theory and color correction are topics that can take up a whole book by themselves; hence, this chapter focuses on just the basics of how to achieve realism, consistency, and artistic stylization by manipulating the following two basic elements of a video image:

  • Chrominance: Chrominance refers to the color of a pixel—its hue—and the intensity of that color—its saturation.

    One of the most common correction procedures related to chrominance is color balancing your image, the process of manipulating red, green, and blue values to achieve a realistic look across the dark parts (shadows), midtones, and bright parts (highlights) of an image.

    (To learn how to color balance your image in Xpress Pro, see “Color Balancing Your Shots” later in this chapter. To learn how to match color between shots, see “Using the Match Color Button” later in this chapter.)

  • Luminance: Separate from the color information in a video clip, luminance refers to the amount of light emitted by any particular pixel (its brightness).

    A common luminance-related procedure is increasing the tonal range of your image, which involves increasing the range of luminance values in an image.

    (To learn how to maximize tonal range and adjust luminance in Xpress Pro, see “Adjusting Tonal Values” later in this chapter.)


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