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Chapter 4. Editing Source Clips > Using Source Markers

Using Source Markers

During the editing process, you often need a way to mark important points in time. Markers allow you to visibly stamp these points both in individual clips and in the time ruler of the Timeline window (Figures 4.35 and 4.36). Markers help you visually identify beats in a song, synchronize video with a sound effect, or note where a title should fade up.

Figure 4.35. Clip markers appear above the marked frame in the Monitor window.


Figure 4.36. In the timeline, clip markers appear within the clip. Program markers appear in the time ruler of the timeline.


In each clip and in the time ruler, you can add up to 10 numbered markers (0 through 9) and up to 999 unnumbered markers. You can quickly cue the clip or the program directly to a numbered marker or to consecutive markers.

When you add markers to a master clip, its markers are included with the clip when you add it to the timeline or when you create a subclip (see “Using Subclips” later in this chapter). The markers aren’t added to existing subclips or instances of the clip that are already in the timeline. This means that each instance of the clip and each subclip can have a unique set of markers and aren’t subject to unintentional changes.

Though many of the same techniques can be used for setting markers in the time ruler and for working with program clips, features and techniques unique to those types of markers are discussed in Chapter 6, “Editing in the Timeline.”

To add a marker to a clip in the source view:

1.
Open a source clip in the source view or in a clip window.

2.
Cue the current frame to the point where you want to add a marker.

3.
In the Monitor window, click the marker button (Figure 4.37).

Figure 4.37. In the Monitor window, click the marker button.


The Marker menu appears.

4.
From the Marker menu, choose one of the following options (Figure 4.38):

Figure 4.38. From the Marker menu, choose an unnumbered or numbered marker for the current frame.


Mark > Unnumbered— to mark the frame with an unnumbered marker.

Mark > 0–9— to mark the frame with a marker numbered 0–9.

This marker appears above the source view whenever the clip is cued to the marked frame (Figure 4.39).

Figure 4.39. This marker appears above the source view whenever the clip is cued to the marked frame.


To add source markers on the fly:

1.
Play a clip in the source view or in a clip window.

2.
Do either of the following:

  • To add unnumbered markers, press the asterisk key (*) in the number keypad, or press -- (Mac) or -- (Windows).

  • To add numbered markers, press - (Mac) or - (Windows) and a number.

    When you stop playback, the markers appear.

Tips

  • Adding a marker to a frame where another marker exists overwrites the first marker. Applying a numbered marker to a different frame eliminates its original position.

  • Markers are helpful for marking where lines of dialog or voiceover begin and end. Try using a numbered marker at the beginning of a line and an unnumbered marker at the end of a line. This technique preserves your limited numbered markers, and makes it easy to identify pauses between lines (which often need to be cut).

  • Setting a poster frame actually sets the 0 marker for a clip. Therefore, resetting the 0 marker also resets the poster frame. For more information about poster frames, see Chapter 3.

  • The 0 marker/poster frame also has special uses with effects, titles, and the frame-hold command. You may want to reserve the 0 marker for these purposes.


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