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Chapter 16. Capturing Video > Adding Timecode Manually

Adding Timecode Manually

Even if your equipment doesn’t support timecode, you can still add timecode to a captured clip manually. You should set the timecode manually when you capture from a timecode window dub.

Many productions use timecode window dubs to avoid overusing the precious original tapes—and to avoid the costs of buying or renting an expensive professional deck. To make a window dub, the camera originals are copied onto a more inexpensive and expendable tape format, such as VHS. The window dub doesn’t usually contain the timecode from the original tape, but it does record a display of the source tape’s timecode as part of the video image. As part of the video image, the “burned-in” timecode isn’t meant to be read by video equipment, but by humans like you. In a traditional offline edit, an editor can generate an edit decision list (EDL) manually by transcribing the burned-in timecode numbers from the beginning and end of each shot in the program.


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