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Chapter 11. At Last: Creating Final Output > Anatomy of the Edit to Tape Window

Anatomy of the Edit to Tape Window

Just as you use the Canvas window to play back and then add new clips to your edited sequence, you use the Edit to Tape window interface (Figure 11.16) to view and add new clips to a videotape. When you are editing to tape, the Viewer window still acts as your source monitor, but the Edit to Tape window replaces the Canvas. That's why the Edit to Tape window has many of the same controls as the Canvas window. You'll find the same transport controls and timecode fields. The editing control buttons and edit overlay operate just as they do in the Canvas, but because you are editing to tape, the edit types available to you in the Edit to Tape window are Insert, Assemble, and Preview—which are the basic edit types in tape-to-tape video editing systems.

Figure 11.16. Use the Edit to Tape window to perform frame accurate Insert and Assemble edits to videotape, using Final Cut Pro's output as source material.



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