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Chapter 3. Shooting > The Hollywood Way—A Helpful Paradigm

The Hollywood Way—A Helpful Paradigm

In the parlance of filmmaking, a setting for a particular part of the movie is called a scene. A scene is limited not by length but rather by location. A change of rooms is a change of scene; a change from an interior to an exterior location is a change of scene.

In Hollywood, scenes are labeled with a number that links them to a place in the script (as in “Scene 14”). Within each scene, the camera is set up in a single position and pointed in a certain direction, and the actors get in front of the lens and perform. Each shot taken from this one position is called a setup. For a single scene, there may be a bunch of setups: Wide shots and close-ups taken from the same physical location are still identified as different setups. Therefore, a director may shoot several scenes from here, move the camera over there and shoot several more scenes, and so on.


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