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Using Subclips

If you want to name an instance of a clip, or if you want it to be listed separately in the program, you should create a subclip. A subclip is created from a portion of a master clip.

Subclips provide you another way to subdivide and organize your source materials. You can create several subclips from a very long master clip, for example, and give each copy a unique name. Without subclips, you would have to search through the lengthy master clip to find the part that you want to use.

Just as master clips refer to media files, subclips refer to the master clip from which the clips were created. If the master clip is deleted, its subclips are also deleted. Otherwise, subclips function exactly like master clips.

In this book and elsewhere, the generic term clip refers to both master clips and subclips unless making a distinction between those terms is important.

To create a subclip:

1.
Open a master clip in the source view or a separate clip window.

2.
Cue the clip to the frame where you want the clip to start, and click the mark in button or press .

3.
Cue the clip to the frame where you want the clip to end, and click the mark out button or press (Figure 4.62).

Figure 4.62. Open a master clip, and set edit marks.


Any markers that you set in the master clip are included in the subclip.

4.
Drag the clip from the source view or clip window to the Project window (Figure 4.63).

Figure 4.63. Drag the clip from the source view or clip window to the Project window.


The Duplicate Clip dialog box opens.

5.
Enter a name for the subclip, and click OK (Figure 4.64).

Figure 4.64. In the Duplicate Clip dialog box, enter a name for the subclip, and click OK.


The subclip appears in the Project window with the name you specified (Figure 4.65). The subclip contains only the portion of the master clip you specified by setting in and out points in the master clip.

Figure 4.65. The subclip appears in the Project window with the name you specified.


Tip

Copying, pasting, and dragging clips to the timeline creates another instance of the clip, not a subclip. See "Master Clips and Clip Instances" earlier in this chapter.


Tip

The whole point of creating a subclip is to define a more limited range of frames. If you decide that you need frames that were in its associated master clip, you have to open the master clip.


Tip

Duplicating or copying and pasting a clip in the project window also creates a subclip. These methods, however, create a subclip that's a complete copy of the master clip rather than a selected portion of the master clip.


Tip

Subclips are also useful for creating a story board edit, as described in Chapter 5.


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