• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 11. Standard Effects in Action > Using the Compound Blur Effect

Using the Compound Blur Effect

The Compound Blur effect is a little less straightforward than the other blur and sharpen effects, largely because it's a compound effect. (Compound effects are discussed in more detail in Chapter 10.) Like all compound effects, the Compound Blur effect requires a target layer (the layer you want to blur) and a source layer (which serves as the blur layer). The blur layer can be any grayscale image—bright areas cause more blur, dark areas cause less blur. For the most predictable results, the blur layer should have the same dimensions as the target layer.

To use the Compound Blur effect:

1.
Place the two layers to be blurred in the composition.

The target layer will serve as the visible, blurred layer, while the source layer will define the areas to be blurred.

Because brightness levels define the degree of blurriness, a grayscale image will suffice for the source layer.

2.
In the Time Layout window, click the eye icon for the source layer, to turn off its visibility (Figure 11.23).

Figure 11.23. Arrange a target layer and an effect source (or blur layer) in a composition. Switch off the video for the blur layer by clicking the eye icon.


The eye icon disappears, preventing the source layer image from appearing in the composition.

3.
Select the target layer and choose Effect > Blur & Sharpen > Compound Blur (Figure 11.24).

Figure 11.24. Choose Effect > Blur & Sharpen > Compound Blur.


The Effect Controls window appears with the layer's Compound Blur effect selected (Figure 11.25).

Figure 11.25. The Effect Controls window appears with the layer's Compound Blur effect selected.


4.
In the Effect Controls window, choose the source layer from the Blur Layer pull-down menu (Figure 11.26).

Figure 11.26. Choose the source layer from the Blur Layer pull-down menu.


5.
Choose any of the following options, as necessary:

Maximum Blur value— sets the upper limit for the amount of blur caused by the brightest areas of the blur layer (the source layer) (Figure 11.27).

Figure 11.27. Set the Maximum Blur value.


Stretch Map to Fit— resizes the source layer to match the size of the target layer.

Invert Blur— reverses the blurring effects of the bright and dark areas of the source layer.

The source layer defines the amount of blur in the target layer. The brightness values of the source layer determine the areas and intensity of the effect in the target layer (Figure 11.28). Brighter areas result in more blur.

Figure 11.28. The brightness values determine the areas and intensity of the blur effect in the target layer.



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint