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Compound Effects

One subcategory of effects requires two layers to operate: they're called compound effects. Compound effects are not listed separately; you'll find them among the effects in various categories. Sometimes, they actually use the word, "compound," in their names (Compound Arithmetic, or Compound Blur) though many compound effects don't have the word "compound" in their names (Texturize, or Displacement Map).

Like other effects, you apply a compound effect to the layer you want to alter. However, a compound effect relies on a second layer —an effect source or modifying layer—as a kind of map for the effect. Typically, this is a grayscale image, because many compound effects are based on the modifying layer's brightness levels. In a Compound Blur effect, for example, the brightness levels of the modifying layer determine the placement and intensity of the blur effect in the target layer (see "Using the Compound Blur Effect," later in this chapter). The modifying layer can be a still image, movie, or nested composition (Figure 10.69).


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