• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Team

A team is a small group of interdependent individuals who collectively have the expertise, knowledge, and skills needed to complete an assigned task or ongoing work. Team members have clear roles and responsibilities, share a vision and sense of purpose, and are collectively accountable for completing tasks and reaching the team’s goal. It’s harder to create a team than a workgroup or a collaborative workgroup. In organizational cultures that prize individual achievement, building and leading an effective team can be very difficult.

When Is a Team Not a Team?

Sports provides our most common model for what teams are and how they operate. But not all athletic units fit the description of teams. Wrestling teams, golf teams, and swim teams, for example, are groups of people all of whom perform the same or similar tasks. Each person in the group may train individually. During training and competition, the group members don’t need to cooperate or even communicate with one another. They perform separately, one at a time. These kinds of teams are, using the definitions provided in this guidebook, more akin to workgroups.

Soccer, basketball, and baseball teams, on the other hand, bring together people with different and complementary skills. No individual player can win a game. All team members need to know what the game strategy is so that they can play their individual roles accordingly. What actions each player takes, and when, depends to some extent on what other members of the team do. The members of the team are interdependent. This interdependency and shared purpose is part of what we mean by team. Those same qualities are reflected in teams that work in the business world.



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint