• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part VI: Step 3: Problem Analysis > The Problem-Cause Analysis

Chapter 26. The Problem-Cause Analysis

Problem-Cause Analysis produces the true problem definition. So why have we taken valuable time with Steps 16 and 21? Because it is extremely difficult to sort through the mental and emotional issues that cloud a problem. Previous steps helped create general awareness of what the problem is and isn’t. Now we will sort out the causes, contributing forces or stimuli, that raised the problem in the first place, from the effects, symptoms and by-products of the causes.

Step 26 looks for the root cause of the problem. The root cause is a controllable, solvable force which explains why the problem exists. Chester Barnard, an early author on the process of management, called this “the limiting factor.” As chief executive of a large regional telephone company several decades ago, he found that the only problems which reached his desk were ones with a missing link. When he was able to ferret out this missing link or “limiting factor,” a problem could finally be resolved once and for all.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint