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Chapter 2. Why Facilitation? > Leadership and Facilitation

Leadership and Facilitation

When one speaks of facilitation, the word can be applied at different levels. For example, in terms of leadership style, a major trend is to reposition leaders from an authoritarian to a facilitative (coaching) style. A comparison of authoritarian and facilitative leadership styles is illustrated below.

Auhoritarian Style Facilitative/Coaching
Task oriented Quality oriented
One-way communicators Encourages empowerment of workers to solve problems and make decisions
Subordinates are a “pair of hands”
Uses direct and implied threats Emphasizes trust, innovation, and risk taking
Makes all decisions Defines jobs broadly and utilizes cross training
Uses policy and structure Works for consensus from teams
Uses extrinsic rewards to motivate (e.g., money, promotions, etc.) Skilled at getting teams involved in improvement actions
Good at “office politics” Uses intrinsic motivation (e.g., praise, achievement, etc.)
Considered the “expert”
Pushes change directed from top Works to initiate change through groups
Works “one on one” with subordinates Works across team boundaries to get team resources
Subordinates are to please boss Employees serve group’s needs



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