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Exercises

1: In the following scenario, two project managers, Jennifer and Nicholas, are seated in the conference room.

Jennifer: Nicholas, I’m not sure how to manage a couple of people in my project team. Can you help me?

Nicholas: I’ll try. What’s the problem?

Jennifer: I have two team members who have drastically different personality styles. Cindy is independent and self-motivated, but Joanna is the exact opposite. If she’s assigned a task, she completes it. However, she’s not performing up to her abilities. I want to step in, but I don’t want to create boundaries that will stifle Cindy.

Nicholas: Hmm, sounds like you really need to talk to Joanna privately and set some clear expectations with her. She might need a little extra supervision.

Jennifer: How can I do that without making her feel singled out?

Nicholas: Speak to her privately. Explain the situation to her and set some goals together. It’s okay to have different levels of supervision for your team members. That way you can provide team members with the appropriate amount of motivation for their personality styles.

According to McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y, in which category will Cindy fall?

  1. Theory X

  2. Theory Y

How should Jennifer motivate Joanna based on the conversation?

2: In this scenario, Jody is a single woman working as a book editor. She has a nice home and can afford to live well. She feels safe in her home and at work. She interacts well with others but does not feel that she receives recognition from her peers. According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, identify the levels of need that are being met in the case of Jody.
  1. Survival needs

  2. Safety needs

  3. Social needs

  4. Esteem needs

  5. Self-actualization needs

3: In the following scenario, two project managers, Jennifer and Nicholas, are seated in the conference room.

Jennifer: Nicholas, I really want to get this project team off to a great start. Any pointers?

Nicholas: It’s very important to keep your team members satisfied with both the work environment and the project teamwork. A satisfied team is a productive team.

Jennifer: What do you mean by satisfied?

Nicholas: Well, team members have to be comfortable in the environment. They need to feel a bond with and a commitment to their team members. Icebreaker activities will help build that commitment.

Jennifer: Icebreaker activities – good idea. What about being satisfied with the work? Isn’t satisfaction determined at the end of the project?

Nicholas: Satisfaction at the end of a project is the result of satisfaction of needs during the project. If you start by providing the necessary resources and helping team members understand how important they are to the project, you can improve your chances of having satisfied team members.

Identify the hygiene factors and motivators in the conversation.

4: Based on Maslow’s Hierarchy, identify the kind of need for the following individuals.

Lisa wants to lead a team.

Chris wants to earn more money to pay off his debts.

Marcus wants to obtain job security.




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