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Part IV: Conducting team meetings > Unit summary: Conducting team meetings

Chapter 13. Unit summary: Conducting team meetings

Topic A In this unit, you learned about various roles in project team meetings. You learned that the roles of facilitator and recorder are assigned roles while team members might also assume unassigned roles such as advocate, coordinator, assessor, concluder, expert, and cheerleader. Then, you learned that you should use a four-step process to maximize the effectiveness of team meetings. You also learned that team cohesion is an important part of improving efficiency during team meetings because it promotes a dedication and responsibility towards the team by the team members.
Topic B You learned that the purpose of introductory meetings is to familiarize team members with each other, introduce the facilitator and recorder, and clarify any questions team members might have. You also learned that it is important to establish ground rules and identify the expected and desired outcomes for the project during this meeting. Then you learned that goals are outcomes that must be accomplished for a project to be considered successful. There are five steps for teams to remember when setting goals: generate goals, outline objectives, ask for feedback, listen, and state the method for accomplishing the goals. You can remember these steps by using the acronym GOALS.
Topic C Finally, you learned that there are several communication issues that might affect project teams during meetings including a lack of understanding, physical communication barriers, and mental communication barriers. Project teams might also face communication issues outside team meetings. Misperceptions and biases are the two most common communication issues that might affect a project team when not in meetings. Misunderstood roles and selfish attitudes are other issues that can contribute to conflict. You learned to manage conflict using seven guidelines including recognizing mutual goals, avoiding assumptions, dealing with issues, discussing tangibles, making requests rather than demands, focusing on one issue at a time, and maintaining team cooperation.



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