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Flow

Many of the gains from change projects can be found in the learning and knowledge that develops as part of the change process. For example, a company might be in the process of upgrading its local network. There will be the chance to look at the alignment between the organizational structure and the network configuration; the opportunity to meet and learn from external agents and contractors; a chance to experience the customer experience from a personal perspective. The problem is that organizations can become so engrossed in the tangible outcome that they fail to take the opportunity to learn from the experience itself.

Although you will obviously be focused on the end delivery, there is also a requirement to ensure that people take time to reflect and learn. For each deviation or problem that emerges during the project, people will normally go through three distinct phases. The first stage is to undertake an action as set out in the plan. As a result, the client will have something that they can reflect on. This reflection might take the form of what happened, did it go according to plan, what action did I take to make a correction? From this reflective process, the client will have ample data on which to base conclusions and so create new knowledge. This is then pushed back into the change, to either ease the change process or to store away for use at a further date.


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