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Examples

Here are some of your choices, none of which are bad. Remember that all choices can culminate in the sale of the company. It’s just a matter of how easy it will be to own and stay on top of the cash flows and share them with others.

  1. Cash flow, hopefully comparable to a regional rain pipe during a torrential downpour that you have somehow succeeded in anchoring above your head.

  2. Asset sales, piece by piece, until you have an enterprise that provides you with ample cash flows and few if any shareholders other than yourself. This would be akin to buying a large parcel of land, carving off and selling that portion that would be necessary to pay for the whole purchase, and living on the remaining parcel.

  3. Partnering whereby you attach your company to a large enterprise.

  4. IPO where you register your stock with the NASD and sell it to the public at large. This is where your investors are likely to push you, possibly through terms in your investment agreements (be aware of registration rights), unless you have a great explanation about the virtues of other alternatives.

  5. Merger with or acquisition by someone else—they can be smaller or larger, just so the check clears the bank.


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