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Part II: Client-Side JavaScript > Cascading Style Sheets and Dynamic HTML

Chapter 18. Cascading Style Sheets and Dynamic HTML

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a standard for specifying the visual presentation[1] of HTML (or XML) documents. In theory, you use HTML markup to specify the structure of your document, resisting the temptation to use deprecated HTML tags such as <font> to specify how the document should look. Instead, you use CSS to define a style sheet that specifies how the structured elements of your document should be displayed. For example, you can use CSS to specify that the level-one headings defined by <h1> tags should be displayed in bold, sans-serif, centered, uppercase, 24-point letters.

[1] And, in the CSS2 standard, also the aural presentation.

CSS is a technology intended for use by graphic designers or anyone concerned with the precise visual display of HTML documents. It is of interest to client-side JavaScript programmers because the document object model allows the styles that are applied to the individual elements of a document to be scripted. Used together, CSS and JavaScript enable a variety of visual effects loosely referred to as Dynamic HTML (DHTML).[2]

[2] Many advanced DHTML effects also involve the event-handling techniques we'll see in Chapter 19.


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