• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part IIB: Intermediate Workshops > Developing Time-Based Animations

Workshop Chapter 12. Developing Time-Based Animations

Flash is a frame-based animation tool. As you know, just because you set the frame rate to 120 frames per second, that doesn’t mean Flash will really display that many frames in one second. The frame rate you specify is more of a top end that Flash will not exceed. Even if you keep your frame rate down in the normal range of 20 fps, there’s a good chance that Flash will occasionally take longer than one-twentieth of a second to display a frame. The standard practice is to just make sure that your movie performs adequately on a slow machine, although there’s still no guarantee.

If you use audio set to stream, Flash will drop frames to maintain a constant rate of sound. However, this approach to maintaining a particular speed has its drawbacks as well. This workshop chapter explores ways you can write your own code that effectively drops frames to keep up with a predetermined rate. This doesn’t mean that you can actually reach the mythical 120 fps (Flash’s maximum), but rather that you can make sure that your graphics stay on time. For example, you can designate that a circle will rotate fully in 10 seconds. On a super-slow machine, the circle might display only four times: at 0, 90, 180, and 360 degrees. On a fast machine, however, the circle might display at all 360 discrete angles. Regardless of the machine speed, however, one second after the clip starts, the circle will have made a full revolution. You’ll learn how to accomplish this feat in this workshop chapter.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint