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Part I: Understanding Your Attitude > Safeguarding Your Attitude

Chapter 5. Safeguarding Your Attitude

What are some of your most important assets? Perhaps your car, your computer, a boat or camper, a stereo–items that can easily be stolen. When you think of your positive attitude as an asset, does it occur to you that your attitude can also be stolen? It happens all the time.

Grand Theft Attitude

Jay, a respected salesman for a regional printer, thought his working relationship with GenCo was pretty solid, but he got the shock of his life when GenCo switched its annual report to a competitor. Not only did the loss of this major project mean a reduction in income for Jay, but it tarnished his image in his three-state market. He complained and moped about the incident for weeks. Eventually, he became so negative that GenCo took him off their preferred list, and it was downhill after that. Jay turned in his car last week. Not only did his competitor “steal” a key project, but Jay allowed his positive attitude to be “stolen” as well.

About a month ago, Liz, a claims administrator in the home office of a large insurance company, got into an argument with Ted, a branch manager in another time zone. She unloaded a ton of stored-up grievances. When the incident was over, rather than clearing up the matter and trying to restore their relationship, Liz continued to stew over it and eventually her attitude turned negative. Liz allowed this unresolved conflict to “steal” her positive attitude, and it affected her work with several other branch managers in that region.

Heather and Brian had been going together for about a year when it became obvious that things weren’t going to work out. After several recent disagreements and heated arguments, they split up. It became painfully obvious to her friends and family that Heather’s attitude had turned negative. As often happens, Heather carried her negative attitude to work. After a couple of weeks of tension, her friend and co-worker, Nancy remarked: “Face it, Heather, you’ve put all the blame on Brian, and you’ve become angry and vindictive. Brian’s history now, so don’t let him steal your positive attitude on his way out the door.”



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