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Chapter 15. Using the Internet > Internet Addresses (URLs)

Internet Addresses (URLs)

How does the browser find a particular document? It employs an addressing method known as the Universal Resource Locator (URL). Each page on the Web has its own URL. A look at how a URL is put together might make it easier to visualize how documents are found.

Here is an example of a URL: http://www.videologies.com/assistant.htm. The first section (http) is the protocol. This indicates the type of Internet service the URL uses, in this case hypertext transfer protocol—http. When typing a URL using a modern browser, you usually do not have to include the http:// prefix. It is automatically added when you access the site. The two slash marks (//) indicate that the next section of the URL will be a domain name. In our example, the domain name consists of videologies.com. This is enough information to direct the browser to the host computer. When it reaches the site, it will pull up the default home page, unless a particular file is specified.


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