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Chapter 28. Grammar > Conjunctions

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are words that connect parts of a sentence. The simplest conjunctions are called coordinating conjunctions. They include: and, but, or, yet, for, nor, and so.

When a coordinating conjunction connects two independent clauses, it is often accompanied by a comma. For example, John wants to play football for Texas, but he has had trouble with his grades. It is also correct to use a comma with and when used to attach a list item in a list. For example, John needs to study harder in math, history, physics, and economics. When a coordinating conjunction is used to connect all the elements in a series, a comma is not used. For example, Math and history and physics are the subjects that give John the most trouble. Commas are also used with but when a sentence expresses a contrast. For example, John is a great player, but not very smart.


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