• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Examples

Example 24: Monitoring Progress

We already looked at the idea of breaking things down and then reporting the smaller jobs identified as being either done or not done. There is an additional aspect of this that is worth noting. Say, for example, you have a weekly status meeting where people must say how they're doing. (These comments apply equally well when the status is reported via progress reports rather than a meeting.) If someone is attending week after week and reporting that a particular job they're working on is not done, then the (peer or self-imposed) pressure generated by this should cause that person to focus more on getting the thing done, so that he or she can report that it's finished.

Example 25: Reducing Stress (Part 1)

You can use Principle 6 and Principle 3 (“There is always a sequence of events”) to help you reduce stress. In Chapter 3, you saw the idea of thinking of the sequence of events as a stack from which we took jobs as they needed to be done. In considering each of these jobs, we can determine—using Principle 6—if it must be done by us or not. If we must do it, then let's get to it. If not, then that should mean somebody else must do it. In that case, there is nothing you can do about it, and there's no point in worrying about it, so just wait until they get it done. The Dalai Lama puts it succinctly in saying that if a situation or problem is such that it cannot be fixed, there is no need to worry about it—you can't do anything about it anyway [1].


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint