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Chapter 1. Many Things Are Simple > So What Should You Do?

So What Should You Do?

1.
Look for simple solutions by asking, “What would be the simplest thing to do here?”

2.
Ask simple questions: Who? What? Why? Where? When? How? Which?

3.
Ask for simple answers. This is particularly important when you are dealing with highly technical people.

4.
Try to describe something—an issue, a problem, a solution, a proposal—coherently in 25 words or less.

5.
Can you describe that same thing in just 30 seconds? This is sometimes called the “elevator story” or “elevator pitch,” the idea being that you meet some important person in an elevator and you've got the travel time of the elevator to convey your message.

6.
Write down the issue, problem, solution, or proposal. If you find you have ended up with a complex solution or idea, you have probably gone in the wrong direction. Go back and look again, this time in the simple direction.

7.
When you come up with something, ask if there a simpler way.

8.
Get people to tell it to you as if you're a six-year-old.

9.
Remember the acronym KISS (keep it simple, stupid).

10.
Read Edward De Bono's book, Simplicity [4].

11.
Read any of Edward De Bono's books on lateral thinking, for example, Lateral Thinking for Management [5].

12.
Read Gelb's How to Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci [2].

PRINCIPLE 1: MANY THINGS ARE SIMPLE



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