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Examples

Example 4: Figuring Out What You've Been Asked to Do

Let's try and illustrate all of the preceding with an example. Let's assume your organization is expanding. You need more people and you've decided to run a job advertisement. This process seems straight forward enough: Write the ad, run it, and deal with the fallout from it. Let's see if applying our tools adds any value or provides us with any new insights.

Let's first try to understand what we're trying to do. How will we know when we're finished? This is actually a very interesting question, and the answer is not at all as obvious as would first appear. Are we finished when the ad runs? When we've processed the results? Run the interviews? Hired the people? Something else? In terms of the quality of what is delivered, if we spend large amounts of the company's money to run an ad, and we end up getting no responses, has this been a success? Do we care (on the basis that it's not our money)? If our existing people see an ad, will there be issues about salary scales or job descriptions or conditions? If the hiring of the people lies within the scope of what we are doing, then we will have to involve other people—the human resources department, at the very least. I hope you can see that even by asking only a few of our questions, we find that this business of running an ad is not at all as one-dimensional and well-defined as it might have appeared at first glance.


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