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Chapter 2. Buy Your Camera Gear > Comparing Storage Media

Comparing Storage Media

The storage medium is the digital equivalent of film. Some early digital cameras used computer floppy disks for storage; you could pop the disk out of the camera and into your floppy drive to transfer the shots. But floppy disks hold a measly 1 megabyte (MB) of data—not much in this day and age. Sony made some cameras that used a type of rewritable compact disc. Like the floppy models, you could put this disc into a drive on your computer and see your work. But it took along time to write each picture to the hard disk, so you had a longer wait between shots. And it was murder on battery life.

Virtually all current digital cameras use solid-state storage devices, usually referred to as storage cards. These use no moving parts to record, so they are much more reliable than the floppy or CD models, and they use less battery power. Plus, they record shots quickly, minimizing the wait time.


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