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Part II:: Practical Retouching > Creating Duotones, Tritones, n-tones, and Colo...

Chapter 9. Creating Duotones, Tritones, n-tones, and Colorizations

“The world is not black and white. More like black and grey.”

The London Observer thought enough of that cryptic quote by Graham Greene (the dead British novelist, not the living Native American actor) to publish it, leaving us to wonder whether Greene was talking about morality or English weather. But no matter. Greene’s quotation applies well enough to the realm of photography, too. Some of the most interesting images in our photographic heritage are not really black-and-white pictures, although that’s what we call them. The best work by Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, or Edward Weston generally have more deep blacks and rich, nuanced tones of gray in them than actual white. The blacks, the grays, the shadows, the midtones—all have a power that gaudy colors and blank, empty whites do not.


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