• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 9. Creating Duotones, Tritones, ... > Working with Multiple Tones

Working with Multiple Tones

Some people can’t leave well enough alone. Why take a perfectly good black-and-white photograph and daub it with fake colors? If that’s all we did, it would indeed be a dumb idea. However, just as a plain grayscale photograph can make a powerful unadorned image, adding a little color can take advantage of the inevitable ways that a little tint can color our viewpoint. The next couple projects show you just how far you can go with only a limited amount of color.

A Spoonful of Color…

We view with our eyes, but see with our brains. For reasons well-known to color scientists, but a mystery to those of us who skipped that class in physics (or was it Psych 101?), we see certain colors in certain ways. Particular hues evoke particular moods. Some are easy to fathom: We see reddish tones as “warm” and bluish casts as “cool.” Anyone who’s snuggled up to the glowing embers of a fireplace or frozen their feet tromping through snow on a moonlit night can figure that one out.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint