• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 7. Working with Adjustment Layer... > Merging Adjustment Layers

Merging Adjustment Layers

Photoshop lets you create as many adjustment layers as needed. For example, you might create a Levels adjustment layer to balance image contrast, Curves to correct color, and a Photo Filter, to create an overall warming effect to the image. Each adjustment layer works with the other adjustment layers to produce the final image. It's not unusual to have three, four, or even five adjustment layers controlling a single image. At some point in the design, you might decide to save space by merging some or all of the adjustment layers. However, when you merge the adjustment layers, the image looses the effect produced by the adjustments. The reason lies in how Photoshop works with adjustment layers. Each adjustment layer controls one part of the adjustment. The layers themselves do not hold an image; they hold mathematical data on how to change an image. Each adjustment layer holds data relating to a specific adjustment, such as Curves or Levels. A single adjustment layer cannot hold more than one set of adjustments. That's why you have multiple adjustment layers. Merging two or more adjustment layers together forces Photoshop to discard all of the adjustment data and the merged adjustment layers turn into a plain old transparent layer. To solve the problem, try merging the adjustment and the image layers into a single layer.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint