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Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments

First, I'd like to thank the contributing authors on this project. They provided their incredible expertise in order to ensure that you, the reader, get the highest quality coverage of the programs of the Adobe Creative Suite. Richard Romano and Dan Giordan are top-notch professionals and deserve a round of applause.

Also near the top of my acknowledgement list must certainly be the entire team at Que. Acquisitions editor Betsy Brown rode herd on the project with an unmatched professionalism. During a difficult period in the middle of the project, following the death of my father and a serious illness of my own, she showed the concern and understanding of a much-honored colleague. And, when necessary, she showed she can crack the whip with the best of 'em, too! Development editor Lorna Gentry worked tirelessly to ensure that every line of the book is not only error-free, but clear as a bell. (“When in doubt, add another figure!”) Bart Reed not only worked diligently to exterminate typos, he provided another excellent eye on content. The entire group performed efficiently and diligently to ensure that the product is the best possible, and that it was available to you as expeditiously as possible.

Next, let me acknowledge the fine professionals at Adobe who produced the Creative Suite, as well as my colleagues who shared their expertise and knowledge during the production of these excellent programs. I'd also like to thank those individuals and companies that supplied the “goodies” you'll find on the CD: Stephanie Robey of PhotoSpin, the gang at nik multimedia, and Takashi Hayashi of CValley. (Many of the images used in the illustrations of this book are from PhotoSpin, too.)

A special thanks to those incredibly caring and generous folks at the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP). Scott and Kalebra Kelby, Jim Workman and Jean Kendra, Jeff Kelby, Dave Moser, Felix Nelson, Chris Main, and the whole gang are such wonderful people that I feel truly honored to call them colleagues. And I owe a huge debt to the membership of NAPP—if it weren't for their often-esoteric questions to the Help Desk, I doubt I'd know half of what I do about Photoshop and Illustrator.

I'd also like to take a brief moment to expand on the dedication of this book. I've always been fond of solving puzzles, a gift I credit to my mother. And from the beginning, I've looked at learning the intricacies of Photoshop, Illustrator, and the other programs and products with which I work as just that—puzzles. How does this do that? What can I do if I try these settings, followed by those settings? Why does this feature have this effect here, yet has that effect there? The methodical manner in which I generally approach such puzzles is likely the result of being the son of a German engineer. My father, the late Herb Bauer, had a rather amazing career. As a human factors engineer, he helped design tanks and automobiles. (Think of him when the seatbelt warning reminds you to buckle up.) As a psychology professor, he taught the first college classes ever offered for credit over television. Yet, I'll remember him most for his love for his wife and his children.

And, as always, I owe a tremendous debt to my own lovely wife, Professor Mary Ellen O'Connell, for her patience, understanding, support, and continued love during the preparation of this book.

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