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Chapter 27. Grayscale, Line Art, and Vectors > Printing Grayscale Images

Printing Grayscale Images

Like most images ultimately destined for a printing press, grayscale images created in Photoshop will likely be imported into a page layout application, such as InDesign, QuarkXPress, or PageMaker. Just as it is important for color images to be in CMYK mode, it is also important for black-and-white images to be in Grayscale mode. If RGB images are incorporated into a black-and-white page layout from which film will be made, you'll have all sorts of output problems, ranging from three pieces of film to one piece of film with empty spaces where your images should be.

It might seem odd to talk about color management in the context of grayscale images, but it's really not that big of a stretch. After all, the whole point of color management is to make the entire imaging process—from working with images in Photoshop to printing—consistent and predictable. So just as it is important to be able to accurately reproduce color images, so, too, is it important to be able to accurately reproduce black-and-white images. It's more common that you think you see a lovely grayscale image on your monitor, only to get a printed version back that contains little more than an indistinct black blob. It gets especially hairy when you're trying to reproduce certain shades of gray in a specific way—for example, the Ansel Adams book mentioned earlier.


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