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Chapter 9. Digital Photography and Photo... > Moving from Film to Digital Photogra...

Moving from Film to Digital Photography

With the exception of the size and the LCD screen on the back, most digital cameras sold today look a lot like their film counterparts. With the increased acceptance of digital photography by film processors, you don't even need a computer to use a digital camera. You can shoot the family holiday photos, take your digital film (memory card) down to the same place that used to develop your film, and get back photos. Although digital photos may appear similar to film photos, there are several major differences in the ways the two types of images are captured. Knowing these differences is important if you want to consistently take good digital photos.

Capturing Images

A film camera works on a principle that is more than 150 years old. When specific combinations of chemicals (film) are exposed to light, their chemical composition changes, and these changes make up a continuous tone negative. The amount of light that strikes the film determines the exposure of the film. Exposure in a modern film camera is controlled by the size of the opening in the camera lens, called aperture, and the length of time the light is allowed to enter the camera, called shutter speed.


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