• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Some Blueprint Basics

Finding your way around a blueprint may be difficult unless you are familiar with its structure. Blueprints follow an early pattern of linkage, perhaps a primitive paper precursor to the hyperlink. Starting with a plan view, you will find elevation symbols and section cuts. They identify a page number to find the actual elevation or more detailed drawing. Drilling deeper into the design are further links to even more detailed sections. These links are often identified with a bubble showing a page number and the detail number. This pattern of primitive icon linkage maps very well to an Internet scheme. The simple addition of href links to the existing bubble icons reproduces a hyperlinked version of our traditional blueprint pattern.

In addition, designs follow a composition rule with more complex features built up from basic features. For example, a detail may be composed of a variety of fasteners, structural items, extrusions, and caulking. This design also maps very well to XML element hierarchies. As an XML grammar, SVG has a natural expression for grouping graphically represented items into a tree structure. In this way, SVG can be both the presentation grammar and, at a deeper level, a model of object relationships. We will not have a chance to dig into this aspect of SVG, but you should look for hierarchical composition of SVG to play an important role in process and manufacturing automation as XML systems become more sophisticated.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint