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Q&A

Q1:How do you know which pictures will make good digital paintings?
A1: For digital watercolors, look for photos with large plain areas and not a lot of detail. In general, try lighter colored pictures, because the Watercolor filter tends to darken images. Though almost any picture makes a good oil painting, I like to use the technique to rescue otherwise bland landscapes. It helps if the subject has interesting contrasts (like ocean and rock), or if there's a good deal of color.
Q2:Can I use more than one filter on a picture?
A2: You can, and many times you may want to use a combination of several filters to achieve a particular effect.
Q3:In the watercolor discussion earlier in this chapter, you recommended waiting until the very end to apply the texture because any changes made before the final save would alter the texture's appearance. Shouldn't those same rules apply to oil paintings as well?
A3: Actually no. Texture is an integral part of oil painting. Paint builds up and hides the canvas or is thinned to bring out the canvas texture. The canvas texture should be applied with the underpainting so that, as you go back and add more paint, you will naturally obscure some of the texture. This makes the picture look less digital and more "painted."
Q4:Who do some filters have ellipses after their names while others don't?
A4: There are two kinds of native Photoshop filters. The ones with an ellipsis (…) open a dialog box with parameters to set before the filter is applied. The filters with no ellipsis are one-step filters. You have no control over the way the filter is applied. When you select a one-step filter from the menu, it's applied—period. You can apply it a second time to double the effect.


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