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Chapter 16. Retouching > Defining Planes

Defining Planes

Before you can get all this magic to work properly, you have to educate Vanishing Point about your image by defining the perspective planes that make up your image. When you first open the filter (Filter > Vanishing Point), you'll be presented with a large dialog box and a small tool palette. Choose the Create Plane tool (which looks like a tiny grid) and click on the four corners of a flat surface in your image so Vanishing Point is aware of how the perspective affects that surface. The rectangle you are defining will change color to indicate if Vanishing Point is having trouble with the plane you're attempting to define. If the grid turns red, Vanishing Point can't figure out how that shape could possibly be a flat rectangular surface as it relates to the perspective you are defining (Figure 16.58). If it turns yellow (Figure 16.59), you have a grid that could be used, but the results will be less than ideal. When the grid becomes blue (Figure 16.60), Vanishing Point is saying “all systems go” and you're ready to start painting or retouching your image. If you define a plane by clicking on the four corners of a small object, you may need to extend the side handles so the grid covers the entire surface (or at least the area you plan to modify). If you plan to work with more than one surface in your image, you'll have to define each plane so Vanishing Point knows how those surfaces relate (Figure 16.61).

Figure 16.58. A red outline is a sign of problems.



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