• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 16. Retouching > Reflected Highlights

Reflected Highlights

When you run across an image that contains glass, metal, or other shiny objects, it usually contains extremely bright highlights (known as specular highlights). This usually happens when light reflects directly off one of those very shiny areas, such as the edge of a glass. These extra-bright highlights often look rather flat and lifeless after being adjusted (Figure 16.114). This happens because whenever we adjust an image to perform color correction, or prepare it for printing or multimedia, the brightest areas of the image usually become 3% or 4% gray (instead of white). But if you sharpen those areas, you're going to brighten them and make them pure white. This will make them stand out and look more realistic. So any time you have jewelry, glassware, or reflected light in people's eyes, you'll want to use the Sharpen tool, bring down the Strength to about 30%, and go over those areas once (Figures 16.115 and 16.116). That will make them almost pure white; when you print them, they will almost jump off the page, as they should (Figure 16.117).

Figure 16.114. Metallic highlights often look a bit dull after performing color correction. (©Stockbyte, www.stockbyte.com)



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint