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Chapter 16. Retouching > Real-World Retouching with Liquify

Real-World Retouching with Liquify

Now that you know how to think about these tools, let's explore how you might use them when retouching an image. When you're trying each of these techniques be extra careful not to go too far with your distortions; otherwise, the changes will become overly obvious. The idea is to change the image so that it looks better than the original, without changing it so much that anyone would notice that it's been tampered with.

Retouching Eyes

In the world of fashion, it is not unusual to enlarge a model's eyes so that your attention is drawn to that part of his or her face (Figures 16.152 and 16.153). Even if you're not a fashion photographer, if you want to give it a whirl, here's what you need to do. (If you want to work on the same image I'm using, open the retouching eyes.jpg image in the Practice Images > Retouching folder on the CD.) First, use the Freeze Mask tool to mask off the surrounding areas of the eye that would probably not look right if they were distorted. That usually includes the eyebrows, nose, and sometimes the sides of the head (Figure 16.154). Next, switch to the Bloat tool, move your mouse over one of the eyes, placing the crosshair that shows up in the middle of the cursor in the pupil of the eye, and then adjust the Brush Size setting (by pressing the ] or [ keys) until your brush is just larger than the perimeter of the eye (Figure 16.155). You'll need to set the Brush Density setting to 100; otherwise, you'll end up enlarging the center of the eye more than the rest of the eye. While you're at it, you might as well change the Brush Rate setting to a low setting like 20 so that you don't have to be overly careful thinking about how long to hold down the mouse button to get the proper change in the image. Now that you have everything set up properly, center your cursor on the blacks of the eye, and then press the mouse button until the eyes look slightly larger (about a second should do it) (Figure 16.156). Then repeat the process on the second eye, making sure that you hold the mouse button for the same amount of time; otherwise, you'll have one eye larger than the other, and we want to avoid anything that would make our subject look like the Bride of Frankenstein.


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