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Chapter 8. Color Correction > Use Gray to Fix Color?!?

Use Gray to Fix Color?!?

Just because I mention RGB mode throughout this chapter doesn't mean that the techniques don't work just as well in CMYK mode. It's just that the initial concept I show you really needs to be performed in RGB mode. So, even though you'll end up dealing with RGB settings at the beginning, Photoshop can translate them into CMYK numbers once you start performing the steps listed under the “Professional Color Correction” section of this chapter. If you just look at the CMYK area of the color picker, you'll see what you'd end up with in CMYK mode.


For the time being I want you to wipe out any thoughts of color. And, no, I'm not crazy. This approach really works, so stick with me. Do you remember how to make gray in the idealized RGB mode that we talked about in the “Color Management” chapter? Equal amounts of red, green, and blue, right? With that in mind, let's open an image and see if we can find an area that should be gray. Then we can look in the Info palette to see if it really is gray in Photoshop—all without having to trust your monitor or your eyes! On the CD, open the image that's called make gray.jpg. The door on the right should be a shade of gray. If the RGB numbers in the Info palette aren't equal—no matter what it looks like on your monitor—it's not gray. If it's not gray, then it must be contaminated with color (Figure 8.1). But could that color be contaminating more than the gray area? Most likely. Then why not use the door as an area to measure what's wrong with the entire image so we have the information we need to fix it? Let's give it a try.


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