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Chapter 16. Retouching > Lighten/Darken

Lighten/Darken

Anyone who does retouching will invariably find themselves needing to retouch the wrinkles that show up under people's eyes. In most cases, the Healing brush does an excellent job because it will automatically blend into the surrounding image, but it does have one weakness: It sometimes tries to blend into the eyelashes, which causes the area under the eyes to become too dark. When that's the case, you can use the Clone Stamp tool and sample the area directly below the wrinkles to clone over the wrinkles. But before you start retouching that area, I suggest that you mess with the blending mode settings from the options bar. (We talked about blending modes in Chapter 13, “Enhancement,” so here we'll just look at what we need for the Clone Stamp tool.) The blending mode pop-up menu in the options bar is labeled Mode. The Lighten and Darken options are both very useful when retouching. If you set that menu to Darken, it will compare what you're about to apply to what the image looks like underneath, and it will only allow you to darken things. So let's say you had a light-colored scratch in the background of your image (Figure 16.48). You could clone from an area directly around it that is the correct brightness. But before you apply the cloned material to the scratch, you might want to set the blending mode to Darken (Figure 16.49). In Darken, all Photoshop can do is darken your picture. Under no circumstances will it be able to lighten it. When working with the wrinkles under eyes, I use the Lighten blending mode and lower the Opacity setting of the Clone Stamp tool to somewhere around 40%.

Figure 16.48. Original image.



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